Suspicious E-mail To Reset My Windows Live Password

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by RTMAN, Dec 9, 2007.

  1. RTMAN

    RTMAN Guest

    I received the following e-mail which is very suspicious since I never
    requested to change my password. I am afraid to follow the instructions to
    cancel the request not knowing who sent this and not wanting to provide any
    information that can be used wrongly. Is there any way to tell if this is
    legitimate?
    (I purposely x'd out my e-mail address.)

    Reset your Windows Live passwordâ€
    From: Microsoft Customer Support ()
    Sent: Sat 12/08/07 6:39 PM

    Hello, : We received your request to reset your
    Windows Live password. To confirm your request and reset your password,
    follow the instructions below. Confirming your request helps prevent
    unauthorized access to your account. If you didn't request that your password
    be reset, please follow the instructions below to cancel your request.
    CONFIRM REQUEST AND RESET PASSWORD
    1. Copy the following web address:
    https://accountservices.msn.com/EmailPage.srf?emailid=db460525dce17b44&ed=B8JguPlbiq9iSoS7jYr8r9pQgtrLUG/892o7eBI55S3acxhpFhgJjpy2dMus&lc=1033&urlnum=0
    IMPORTANT: Because fraudulent ("phishing") e-mail often uses misleading
    links, Microsoft recommends that you do not click links in e-mail, but
    instead copy and paste them into your browsers, as described above.
    2. Open your web browser, paste the link in the address bar, and then press
    ENTER.
    3. Follow the instructions on the web page that opens.
    CANCEL PASSWORD RESET
    1. Copy the following web address.
    https://accountservices.msn.com/EmailPage.srf?emailid=db460525dce17b44&ed=B8JguPlbiq9iSoS7jYr8r9pQgtrLUG/892o7eBI55S3acxhpFhgJjpy2dMus&lc=1033&urlnum=1
    IMPORTANT: Because fraudulent ("phishing") e-mail often uses misleading
    links, Microsoft recommends that you do not click links in e-mail, but
    instead copy and paste them into your browsers, as described above.
    2. Open your web browser, paste the link in the address bar, and then press
    ENTER.
    3. Follow the instructions on the web page that opens. OTHER INFORMATION
    Windows Live is committed to protecting your privacy. We encourage you to
    review our privacy statement Privacy Statement at
    http://g.msn.com/2privacy/enus. For more information, go to the Windows Live
    Account site at https://account.live.com. Thank you, Microsoft Customer
    Support NOTE: Please do not reply to this message, which was sent from an
    unmonitored e-mail address. Mail sent to this address cannot be answered.
     
    RTMAN, Dec 9, 2007
    #1
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  2. RTMAN

    Peter Foldes Guest

    When you signed up for WLM did you select the option box as per below

    "Make Password Expire every 72 days"

    If you did then that is the reason for this legitimate email from Microsoft
     
    Peter Foldes, Dec 9, 2007
    #2
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  3. RTMAN

    StephenB Guest

    It is quite possible that someone thinks that your LiveID is their LiveID and
    tried to login and it failed, hence the password reset request. Let's say your
    LiveID is and the other person is -
    they forgot the underscore when they tried to sign in.
    That happened to me over a few days two weeks ago with one of my accounts.
    Since you did not request the change, ignore the request. The email is a bit
    misleading in that you do not need to cancel the request. If you ignore the
    change request, that is tantamount to canceling the reset request.
    -steve
     
    StephenB, Dec 9, 2007
    #3
  4. RTMAN

    Yroc Guest

    I was sent the same message and also am suspicious of it. Also seems odd
    that it is close in time frame...
     
    Yroc, Dec 20, 2007
    #4
  5. RTMAN

    Leonard Grey Guest

    If there is any doubt in your mind about the legitimacy of that e-mail,
    then P.T. Barnum was right.
     
    Leonard Grey, Dec 20, 2007
    #5
  6. RTMAN

    Kerry Guest

    I received the exact same email 4 times in the last 4 days....and I was very
    suspicious of it. Obvioulsy it isn't one person mistaking my live Id for
    theirs if numerous people are gettign this request....and I don't remember
    checking off the "Password expires in 72 days" option as I have had this
    acocunt for years and have never received an email like this.....it sounds
    like a massive scam but why?

    Kerry G
     
    Kerry, Apr 10, 2008
    #6
  7. RTMAN

    Alex Guest

    I had the same problem, I'm receiving this mail on a daily basis for the last
    5 or 6 days, I even marked it as junk or unsafe, but I'm still receiving it
    in my mailbox....
    So, is it real or not? I'd like to know it before following the link to
    cancel it....

    Thanks

    -Alex-
     
    Alex, Apr 14, 2008
    #7
  8. RTMAN

    Chady Guest

    I have been receiving this email every day for the last week. The problem is
    that the email address domain IS indeed a micorosoft email address!!!!
    However, it is very suspecious and i dont advise anyone to go with it.
    I simply dont feel good about it. And i dont think it is a coincidence that
    everyone here had someone trying to use his ID to login and requested to
    reset the password... what are the odd in that !!! same time of the year all
    of a sudden?
    Block it and it is solved
     
    Chady, Apr 30, 2008
    #8
  9. It's easy for spammers and miscreants to spoof MS's email address...or any
    other address.
     
    PA Bear [MS MVP], Apr 30, 2008
    #9
  10. RTMAN

    Katesfine Guest

     
    Katesfine, May 4, 2008
    #10
  11. RTMAN

    Katesfine Guest

    I have had the same problem - almost daily e-mails like this, all appear to
    be legitimate. I even attempted a reset myself and the e-mail I got was
    exactly the same. The hover Microsoft address is the same as the link, and it
    all seems to be tied into a real reset request.

    Is someone just trying to be annoying be sending the reset rquest (anyone
    with your address can do that)?
     
    Katesfine, May 4, 2008
    #11
  12. RTMAN

    chemik Guest

    I also received the exact same email, but it was sent to my other email
    address which is not a Windows Live ID.

    So just out of curiosity, i went on to Windows Live login page, and try to
    reset password using that email address. I was (pleasantly) suprised to find
    that it will not accept my email address because it is not a valid ID.

    The only conclusion I can draw from this little experiment is that the
    "notification" has to be fake. If you didn't request the reset, you should
    ignore it.
     
    chemik, May 6, 2008
    #12
  13. RTMAN

    Scorch Guest

    I'm getting them too, and I have definitely NOT selected an expiry option.
    Sounds like someone is up to something...
     
    Scorch, Jun 4, 2008
    #13
  14. I got these for about 3 days on one of my accounts.
    If you are seeing this from within Hotmail, your probably didn't request the
    Reset, and you obviously don't need a Reset.
    So regardless if this is a SCAM to another site, or someone accidentialy or
    purposely submitting a Reset Request using your account name, I would suggest:

    Go into your account and manually Reset your Password to a new STRONG
    password.
    Make sure you set up the other options (Alternate Email Address, Special
    Question and Answer)

    The messages seemed to have stopped after my Manual Password Reset.
     
    Kaptain Caveman, Jun 11, 2008
    #14
  15. RTMAN

    nofeedback Guest

    This is a Microsoft website.

    Why doesn't Microsoft clear the confusion about this?

    or .. How much i have to read before i find Microsoft reply?
     
    nofeedback, Jul 8, 2008
    #15
  16. This is not a Microsoft website. It is a Microsoft newsgroup, with
    peer-to-peer support. If you want to get a reply from Microsoft, contact
    them directly.

    : This is a Microsoft website.
    :
    : Why doesn't Microsoft clear the confusion about this?
    :
    : or .. How much i have to read before i find Microsoft reply?
    :
    :
    :
    : "RTMAN" wrote:
    :
    : > I received the following e-mail which is very suspicious since I never
    : > requested to change my password. I am afraid to follow the instructions
    to
    : > cancel the request not knowing who sent this and not wanting to provide
    any
    : > information that can be used wrongly. Is there any way to tell if this
    is
    : > legitimate?
    : > (I purposely x'd out my e-mail address.)
    : >
    : > Reset your Windows Live password?
    : > From: Microsoft Customer Support ()
    : > Sent: Sat 12/08/07 6:39 PM
    : >
    : > Hello, : We received your request to reset your
    : > Windows Live password. To confirm your request and reset your password,
    : > follow the instructions below. Confirming your request helps prevent
    : > unauthorized access to your account. If you didn't request that your
    password
    : > be reset, please follow the instructions below to cancel your request.
    : > CONFIRM REQUEST AND RESET PASSWORD
    : > 1. Copy the following web address:
    : >
    https://accountservices.msn.com/EmailPage.srf?emailid=db460525dce17b44&ed=B8JguPlbiq9iSoS7jYr8r9pQgtrLUG/892o7eBI55S3acxhpFhgJjpy2dMus&lc=1033&urlnum=0
    : > IMPORTANT: Because fraudulent ("phishing") e-mail often uses misleading
    : > links, Microsoft recommends that you do not click links in e-mail, but
    : > instead copy and paste them into your browsers, as described above.
    : > 2. Open your web browser, paste the link in the address bar, and then
    press
    : > ENTER.
    : > 3. Follow the instructions on the web page that opens.
    : > CANCEL PASSWORD RESET
    : > 1. Copy the following web address.
    : >
    https://accountservices.msn.com/EmailPage.srf?emailid=db460525dce17b44&ed=B8JguPlbiq9iSoS7jYr8r9pQgtrLUG/892o7eBI55S3acxhpFhgJjpy2dMus&lc=1033&urlnum=1
    : > IMPORTANT: Because fraudulent ("phishing") e-mail often uses misleading
    : > links, Microsoft recommends that you do not click links in e-mail, but
    : > instead copy and paste them into your browsers, as described above.
    : > 2. Open your web browser, paste the link in the address bar, and then
    press
    : > ENTER.
    : > 3. Follow the instructions on the web page that opens. OTHER
    INFORMATION
    : > Windows Live is committed to protecting your privacy. We encourage you
    to
    : > review our privacy statement Privacy Statement at
    : > http://g.msn.com/2privacy/enus. For more information, go to the Windows
    Live
    : > Account site at https://account.live.com. Thank you, Microsoft Customer
    : > Support NOTE: Please do not reply to this message, which was sent from
    an
    : > unmonitored e-mail address. Mail sent to this address cannot be
    answered.
    : >
     
    Tom [Pepper] Willett, Jul 8, 2008
    #16
  17. If you want a reply from MS (Windows Live), fill out this webform:
    https://support.microsoft.com/contactus/emailcontact.aspx?scid=sw;en;1310&showpage=1&ws=1prcen
     
    PA Bear [MS MVP], Jul 9, 2008
    #17
  18. RTMAN

    Pablo Guest

    Just Got it too...
     
    Pablo, Sep 6, 2008
    #18
  19. RTMAN

    Airdragon Guest

    I can think of why these scammers are trying so hard all in a sudden to get
    live account information. Microsoft just start this cashback stuff and your
    cashback account username/password is the same as your live account. There
    could be hundreds of dollars in a live cashback account...

    I just don't know how they could manage to steal those information by these
    emails; it seems that the links are all legit.
     
    Airdragon, Sep 18, 2008
    #19
  20. RTMAN

    MUC Guest

    IT IS HIGH TIME FOR MICROSOFT TO REACT TO THIS MAIL.

    I have NEVER REQUESTED to be part of MICROSOFT LIVE COMMUNITY.

    I DO NOT WANT IT!

    SPAMMING DOWN THE WORLD WITH WITH MAILS FORCING YOU INTO THEIR STUFF IS NOT
    ACCEPTABLE11

    What next? LINUX, Safari, Firefox....Apple...
     
    MUC, Sep 26, 2008
    #20
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