Microsoft is running a disreputable spyware outfit

Discussion in 'Virus Information' started by Susan Sharm, Oct 31, 2005.

  1. Susan Sharm

    Phil Weldon Guest

    'Alun Jones' wrote, in part:
    | And if adware isn't OK (I'm going to guess that you think that it's not
    OK)
    | for you, all you have to do is pay full price and get the
    non-advert-funded
    | version. Like the difference between your local NBC, CBS, ABC, etc
    | affiliate (where the advertisers are the customers, and the viewers are
    the
    | product being sold) and HBO or Showtime, where the viewers are the
    | customers, and the only adverts are promos for upcoming shows.
    _____

    Re HBO, et al. - ever heard of product placement?
    How about "The Twenty" in a certain cinema chain?

    Check the tides before building your sandcastles B^)

    Phil Weldon

    | [Some trimmed newsgroups added in - and Imhotep, if you've been around for
    | as long as you imply, you'll know that it's considered rude to trim in the
    | follow-up header without warning, so that responses to your diatribe get
    | directed out to podunk.]
    |
    | Imhotep wrote:
    | > Charlie Tame wrote:
    | >
    | >> If MS wanted to infect your machine why not simply build a back door
    into
    | >> the operating system?
    | >
    | > Rumor has it they already have....
    |
    | Rumour has it that Elvis Presley is alive and well, and does proof-reading
    | of all of your posts.
    |
    | Personally, I don't put stock in idle rumour.
    |
    | >> If you get ICQ, Yahoo instant messenger or numerous other "Free" things
    | >> you will find they are paid for by ads, just like your TV. This applies
    | >> to the little picture ads included in their interfaces as well as web
    | >> pages shown on startup that you have set preferences to see. "Someone"
    | >> has to pay the
    | >> people who operate these things, don't they? If not you directly then
    | >> expect advertising.
    | >
    | > Are you actually saying this is OK????
    |
    | Sure, if the user is made aware of it prior to installation, yes.
    |
    | Adware is not evil simply because it's advertisement-funded software.
    |
    | When adware shifts to being malware, it's because the presence of adverts
    is
    | hidden from the installer, or because the adware covertly sends personal
    | information to its "home base" without the informed consent of the user.
    |
    | Adware's a frickin' great idea - supply software to people for free, and
    use
    | the same model for funding that television and radio use. It means that
    | your users are acknowledging that they'll be interrupted by adverts every
    so
    | often, but they've allowed that irritation, in exchange for the right to
    run
    | the software without shelling out the green stuff.
    |
    | It's unfortunate that too many "adware" companies pushed things over to
    the
    | dark side, so that now adware is synonymous with spyware and malware.
    |
    | And if adware isn't OK (I'm going to guess that you think that it's not
    OK)
    | for you, all you have to do is pay full price and get the
    non-advert-funded
    | version. Like the difference between your local NBC, CBS, ABC, etc
    | affiliate (where the advertisers are the customers, and the viewers are
    the
    | product being sold) and HBO or Showtime, where the viewers are the
    | customers, and the only adverts are promos for upcoming shows.
    |
    | >> Being a privacy conscious person you did of course READ the privacy
    | >> policy before signing up, right?
    | >
    | > Ok, blame the user. Common now. This is Microsoft, we are *supposed* to
    | > trust them are we not????
    |
    | "Common now" - see, that's why I don't believe in rumours. Elvis had a
    much
    | better command of the English language than to allow that in.
    |
    | No, you are not supposed to idly trust anyone.
    |
    | You are supposed to read the policy, and you are supposed to verify, to
    the
    | best of your ability, whether that policy is adhered to. Or, if you don't
    | want to go that far, you are supposed to exchange your unknowing trust for
    | the extra time and effort it takes to be eternally vigilant. So, there
    you
    | go - you have those two choices. Three choices, if you coun't "don't
    trust,
    | and therefore don't use". I think you fall into that camp, so I'm
    somewhat
    | surprised to find you continually posting in an area where you seem to
    have
    | no interest or experience.
    |
    | A very dead old man once said "Trust, but verify". Software requires that
    | you either trust it's authors, or don't use it. Software allows you to do
    | some limited verification, based on your experience, your skill, and your
    | desire to spend your time verifying.
    |
    | If you can't verify, and you don't trust, then don't use.
    |
    | Alun.
    | ~~~~
    | [Please don't email posters, if a Usenet response is appropriate.]
    | --
    | Texas Imperial Software | Find us at http://www.wftpd.com or email
    | 23921 57th Ave SE | .
    | Washington WA 98072-8661 | WFTPD, WFTPD Pro are Windows FTP servers.
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    |
    |
     
    Phil Weldon, Nov 15, 2005
    #61
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  2. Susan Sharm

    Alun Jones Guest

    There are benefits to being an MVP (I used to be one). You get a little
    gift, you get an MSDN or TechNet subscription, and you get the ability to
    spend time one-on-one with Microsoft staffers in your specialist area. It's
    a reward for helping people out (and you don't have to be a suck-up to
    Microsoft - just not uniformly anti-Microsoft), and its retrospective -
    awarded for the previous year's help. You can't study to be an MVP, and
    what worked last year to get you awarded might not work next year.

    There have been a few deficits to being an MVP - because the MVP status
    implies that you spend a lot of time answering other people's questions, or
    helping them use software, for free, it's not unknown for employers to be
    concerned that you aren't "giving your all to the company". Mind you,
    you're probably better off not working for an employee who views it as their
    right to drain you completely :)

    Alun.
    ~~~~
    [Please don't email posters, if a Usenet response is appropriate.]
     
    Alun Jones, Nov 15, 2005
    #62
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  3. I hope you all enjoyed your ride on the troll train! (-:

    --


    Regards,

    Richard Urban
    Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User

    Quote from George Ankner:
    If you knew as much as you think you know,
    You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!
     
    Richard Urban, Nov 19, 2005
    #63
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